LISTSERV mailing list manager LISTSERV 16.5

Help for PORTSIDE Archives


PORTSIDE Archives

PORTSIDE Archives


PORTSIDE@LISTS.PORTSIDE.ORG


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

PORTSIDE Home

PORTSIDE Home

PORTSIDE  October 2012, Week 1

PORTSIDE October 2012, Week 1

Subject:

Obama was Elected President Despite Being Lousy in Debates -Who's to Say he Can't be Reelected with the Same Trait?

From:

Portside Moderator <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

[log in to unmask]

Date:

Thu, 4 Oct 2012 20:12:38 -0400

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (311 lines)

Obama was Elected President Despite Being Lousy in Debates -
Who's to Say he Can't be Reelected with the Same Trait?

1. Just how bad is the damage? (Steve Kornacki in Salon)

2. Presidential Debate: Obama Had No Chutzpah, and Why Didn't
He Confront Romney's Blatant Dishonesty More? (Joshua Holland
in AlterNet)

3. The First Presidential Debate (Robert Reich)

=====

Just how bad is the damage? 

by Steve Kornacki

October 4, 2012
Salon

http://www.salon.com/2012/10/04/just_how_bad_is_the_damage/

Let's get the obvious out of the way: Barack Obama lost last
night's presidential debate. The question is how badly it will
hurt him.

Heading into last night, the president enjoyed a lead of 3.1
points in the Real Clear Politics polling average. The margin
was roughly consistent with where the race has been since
Romney secured the Republican nomination in the spring, but it
did reflect a slight tightening over the past week. But the
immediate verdict from voters who watched the debate was
clear, with 67 percent saying Romney fared better in a CNN
flash poll, compared to just 25 percent for Obama. In CBS's
poll of undecided voters, Romney was the victor by a 46-22
percent spread.

Over the next few days, Romney stands to reap some significant
benefits from what happened in Denver:

* The best press coverage of his life. Well, that's probably
overstating it, but Romney is in for the most favorable
stretch of media treatment he's received as a general election
candidate. Since late August, when Republicans staged a dud of
a convention, Romney has been portrayed as a candidate in
decline, and Obama as a resurgent front-runner. There was good
reason for this. Democrats put on perfectly choreographed
convention, Romney suffered through the release of the
devastating "47 percent" video, and polls confirmed that the
momentum was squarely on Obama's side. Anything short of a
clear victory by Romney on Wednesday would have perpetuated
this narrative. But he turned in the performance he needed
(with a huge assist from a bafflingly docile Obama) and has
given the media a new storyline: Romney's back in it - now we
have a real race! At least for the next few days, it will be
Romney who is treated as the candidate on the rise, and Obama
as the one desperately seeking to contain the damage.

* It gets Republicans off his back: This was becoming a
serious problem for Romney. As the reality of his predicament
set in on Republicans over the last month, Romney faced loud
second-guessing from his own party. This had the potential to
demoralize GOP base, and also raised the prospect of
Republican donors, party committees, and outside money groups
deciding that Romney was a lost cause and opting to shift
their resources and energy to Senate and House races - as they
did with Bob Dole in October 1996. All of this destructive
chatter ceased Wednesday night, and the right is now re-
energized, believing once again that the White House is
winnable. we've seen something like this happen before:
Remember the jubilant reaction of Democrats on September 30,
2004, when John Kerry - whom they'd all but given up for dead
- turned in a command debate performance against a listless
George W. Bush?

* Image repair: That Romney was capable of such a forceful
performance was probably a revelation for many voters. He's
been dogged by horrible personal favorable/unfavorable numbers
throughout the campaign and has botched numerous opportunities
(most notably at the GOP convention) to change his image. In a
way, this may have contributed to Romney's success Wednesday
night, with voters perhaps expecting to see the inept, gaffe-
prone candidate they've been hearing about all year. In CNN's
instant poll, 82 percent of voters said Romney had performed
better than they'd expected. (On the flip side, 61 percent
said Obama had done worse than they thought he would.) That
said, the same poll also showed Romney receiving only a
negligible boost in his favorable rating. But the favorable
press coverage he's now in line for coupled with an end to the
griping from his own party could significantly improve his
numbers in the days ahead. To erase the stubborn gap he's
faced all year, Romney needs the overwhelming majority of
undecided voters to break his way. So far, that hasn't been
happening. But if they start warming up to Romney, it could be
a different story.

In the best case for Romney, all of this adds up to a
significant shift in the national horserace, with Romney
drawing even with Obama or even pulling ahead for the first
time - momentum that begets further momentum.  But as good as
things went for him, there are also reasons to suspect the
debate won't end up being that transformative:

* Polarization to the rescue: Romney has been unable to push
past 47 percent in the head-to-head race, and to the extent
the race has tightened over the last week, it's because some
Republican-friendly voters who had strayed from the fold have
come home. (This was also what happened when Romney briefly
pulled even during the GOP convention in August.) As Jamelle
Bouie notes, Romney will have to flip some voters who are now
in Obama's column in order to win, which is a tall order when
you consider how unusually stable polling has been this year.
If there's one thing we've learned, it's that it will take
something very dramatic for Romney to break 47 percent - and
it's not at all clear that this will meet that threshold.

* There are other debates! It's not exactly unheard of for an
incumbent president to turn in a dreadful performance in the
first debate. Bush laid an egg in 2004, so did his father in
1992, and so did Ronald Reagan in 1984. Two of those three
bounced back in the next round - W with a solid showing in his
town hall debate with Kerry, and Reagan with a classic line
that instantly and permanently defused his one liability, his
age. If Obama fares better in the next two debates (and, for
that matter, if Joe Biden performs well against Paul Ryan next
week), the fallout from Wednesday night could be contained.

* we've seen this before: Let's face it: Obama just isn't a
good debater. Over and over again in 2007 and 2008, Hillary
Clinton wiped the floor with him in debates, with Obama
displaying the same maddening passivity he showed Wednesday
night. But it never seemed to move the needle for Hillary. Nor
was Obama that impressive against John McCain in the fall
(although McCain himself wasn't much better.) Obama was
elected president despite being lousy in debates, so who's to
say he can't be reelected with the same trait?

[Steve Kornacki writes about politics for Salon. He's
previously written about politics for the New York Observer
and Roll Call, and his work has also appeared in the New York
Times and Wall Street Journal and on the Daily Beast.]

==========

Presidential Debate: Obama Had No Chutzpah, and Why Didn't He
Confront Romney's Blatant Dishonesty More?

By Joshua Holland

October 3, 2012
AlterNet

http://www.alternet.org/presidential-debate-obama-had-no-chutzpah-and-why-didnt-he-confront-romneys-blatant-dishonesty-more

The pundits' quick reaction to the first presidential debate
was virtually unanimous: Romney had the energy, was well
prepared and pushed his arguments forcefully, while Obama held
back, throwing weak jabs and abandoning the populist message
that he's featured on the campaign trail.

While Romney cited reports and studies, he also talked about
the issues in sweeping, moralistic terms. Obama, on the other
hand, spent much of the evening playing college prof -
reciting facts and figures. Romney was the aggressor throughout
the debate, and moderator Jim Lehrer did a poor job
controlling the discussion.

For weeks, we've been hearing that debates only very rarely
yield a game-changing moment - which is true - and Wednesday
night's meeting was no exception. But the media has a powerful
incentive to cover a tight horserace, so we can expect what
has been the widely accepted conventional wisdom to be turned
on its head in the coming days.

As for ordinary people, a CBS poll of "undecided voters" found
that 46 percent thought Romney won, 22 percent believed Obama
was the victor and 32 percent thought it was a tie. Romney
succeeded in one of his great challenges: according to the CBS
poll, 30 percent of undecided voters thought that Romney
"cared about their concerns" coming into the debate; 63
percent believed that after watching the debate. In CNN's
poll, 53 percent of viewers thought Romney played more
offense, while 30 percent said the same of Obama.

But while a weak performance by Obama will certainly have
liberal hands wringing and conservatives triumphant, Mitt
Romney failed to score a decisive blow. He got in a few
zingers - at one point, he said to Obama, "you have the right
to your own airplane and your own house, but not your own
facts" - the clock is running down and Romney still has a lot
of ground to make up in crucial swing-states like Ohio.
Obama's performance was flat, but there were no major stumbles
that might become news stories unto themselves - no Gerald
Ford-style "there is no Soviet domination of Eastern Europe"
sound-bytes. The most reportable line of the night was
probably when Romney, vowing to cut funding for PBS, insisted
that he liked Big Bird. According to a snap poll by CNN, the
candidates' favorability ratings were unchanged overall by the
debate.

Romney was also notably dishonest. He repeatedly insisted that
his tax plan added up - it doesn't - despite Obama calling him
on it. During the discussion of health-care, Romney deployed
Politifacts' "Lies of the Year" for both 2009 ("death panels")
and 2010 (Obamacare is a "government take-over"). It was an
effective strategy in the short term, but leaves him open to
several days of "fact-checking" by the media. If his mendacity
becomes a story - as it did after Paul Ryan's convention
speech - then these first impressions may not stand up.

CNN also had a focus group giving real-time reactions to what
the candidates were saying. There was a notable gender gap,
with women giving Obama better marks and men expressing a
preference for Romney throughout. Romney did well throughout;
Obama's approval rose markedly when he spoke about health-care
and education - "kitchen table issues."

Ultimately, the much anticipated debate, like a big heavy-
weight match where the boxers spend a lot of time dancing and
weaving, was somewhat anticlimactic. Romney needed a big blow
to change the dynamics of the race. Instead, he'll likely see
a slight movement in his direction in the national polls.
Meanwhile, there are three more debates to go.

[Joshua Holland is an editor and senior writer at AlterNet.
He's the author of The 15 Biggest Lies About the Economy. Drop
him an email < [log in to unmask]> or follow him on
Twitter http://twitter.com/JoshuaHol .]

==========

The First Presidential Debate

"Romney won on style while Obama won on substance"

by Robert Reich

October 4, 2012
RobertReich.org

http://robertreich.org/post/32859968867

In tonight's debate, Romney won on style while Obama won on
substance. Romney sounded as if he had conviction, which means
he's either convinced himself that the lies he tells are true
or he's a fabulous actor.

But what struck me most was how much Obama allowed Romney to
get away with: Five times Romney accused Obama of raiding
Medicare of $716 billion, which is a complete fabrication.
Obama never mentioned the regressiveness of Romney's budget
plan -- awarding the rich and hurting the middle class and the
poor. He never mentioned   Capital, or Romney's 47 percent
talk, or Romney's "carried-interest" tax loophole. Obama
allowed Romney to talk about replacing Dodd-Frank and the
Affordable Care Act without demanding that Romney be specific
about what he'd replace and why. And so on.

I've been worried about Obama's poor debate performance for
some time now. He was terrible in the 2008 primary debates,
for example. Expectations are always high -- he's known as an
eloquent orator. But when he has to think on his feet and
punch back, he's not nearly as confident or assured as he is
when he is giving a speech or explaining a large problem and
its solution. He is an educator, not a pugilist, and this puts
him at a disadvantage in any debate.

Romney stayed on script. If you look at a transcript of his
remarks tonight you'll see that he repeated the same lines
almost word for word in different contexts. He has memorized a
bunch of lines, and practiced delivering them. The overall
effect is to make him seem assured and even passionate about
his position. He said over and over that he cares about jobs,
about small businesses, and ordinary Americans. But his
policies and his record at Bain tell a very different story.

The question now is whether Team Obama understands that our
President must be more aggressive and commanding in the next
two debates -- and be unafraid to respectfully pin Romney to
the floor.

[Robert B. Reich, Chancellor's Professor of Public Policy at
the University of California at Berkeley, was Secretary of
Labor in the Clinton administration. Time Magazine named him
one of the ten most effective cabinet secretaries of the last
century. He has written thirteen books, including the best
sellers "Aftershock" and "The Work of Nations." His latest,
"Beyond Outrage," is now out in paperback. He is also a
founding editor of the American Prospect magazine and chairman
of Common Cause.]

==========

___________________________________________

Portside aims to provide material of interest to people
on the left that will help them to interpret the world
and to change it.

Submit via email: [log in to unmask]

Submit via the Web: http://portside.org/submittous3

Frequently asked questions: http://portside.org/faq

Sub/Unsub: http://portside.org/subscribe-and-unsubscribe

Search Portside archives: http://portside.org/archive

Contribute to Portside: https://portside.org/donate

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

Advanced Options


Options

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password


Search Archives

Search Archives


Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe


Archives

February 2020, Week 4
February 2020, Week 3
February 2020, Week 2
February 2020, Week 1
January 2020, Week 5
January 2020, Week 4
January 2020, Week 3
January 2020, Week 2
January 2020, Week 1
December 2019, Week 5
December 2019, Week 4
December 2019, Week 3
December 2019, Week 2
December 2019, Week 1
November 2019, Week 5
November 2019, Week 4
November 2019, Week 3
November 2019, Week 2
November 2019, Week 1
October 2019, Week 5
October 2019, Week 4
October 2019, Week 3
October 2019, Week 2
October 2019, Week 1
September 2019, Week 5
September 2019, Week 4
September 2019, Week 3
September 2019, Week 2
September 2019, Week 1
August 2019, Week 5
August 2019, Week 4
August 2019, Week 3
August 2019, Week 2
August 2019, Week 1
July 2019, Week 5
July 2019, Week 4
July 2019, Week 3
July 2019, Week 2
July 2019, Week 1
June 2019, Week 5
June 2019, Week 4
June 2019, Week 3
June 2019, Week 2
June 2019, Week 1
May 2019, Week 5
May 2019, Week 4
May 2019, Week 3
May 2019, Week 2
May 2019, Week 1
April 2019, Week 5
April 2019, Week 4
April 2019, Week 3
April 2019, Week 2
April 2019, Week 1
March 2019, Week 5
March 2019, Week 4
March 2019, Week 3
March 2019, Week 2
March 2019, Week 1
February 2019, Week 4
February 2019, Week 3
February 2019, Week 2
February 2019, Week 1
January 2019, Week 5
January 2019, Week 4
January 2019, Week 3
January 2019, Week 2
January 2019, Week 1
December 2018, Week 5
December 2018, Week 4
December 2018, Week 3
December 2018, Week 2
December 2018, Week 1
November 2018, Week 5
November 2018, Week 4
November 2018, Week 3
November 2018, Week 2
November 2018, Week 1
October 2018, Week 5
October 2018, Week 4
October 2018, Week 3
October 2018, Week 2
October 2018, Week 1
September 2018, Week 5
September 2018, Week 4
September 2018, Week 3
September 2018, Week 2
September 2018, Week 1
August 2018, Week 5
August 2018, Week 4
August 2018, Week 3
August 2018, Week 2
August 2018, Week 1
July 2018, Week 5
July 2018, Week 4
July 2018, Week 3
July 2018, Week 2
July 2018, Week 1
June 2018, Week 5
June 2018, Week 4
June 2018, Week 3
June 2018, Week 2
June 2018, Week 1
May 2018, Week 5
May 2018, Week 4
May 2018, Week 3
May 2018, Week 2
May 2018, Week 1
April 2018, Week 5
April 2018, Week 4
April 2018, Week 3
April 2018, Week 2
April 2018, Week 1
March 2018, Week 5
March 2018, Week 4
March 2018, Week 3
March 2018, Week 2
March 2018, Week 1
February 2018, Week 4
February 2018, Week 3
February 2018, Week 2
February 2018, Week 1
January 2018, Week 5
January 2018, Week 4
January 2018, Week 3
January 2018, Week 2
January 2018, Week 1
December 2017, Week 5
December 2017, Week 4
December 2017, Week 3
December 2017, Week 2
December 2017, Week 1
November 2017, Week 5
November 2017, Week 4
November 2017, Week 3
November 2017, Week 2
November 2017, Week 1
October 2017, Week 5
October 2017, Week 4
October 2017, Week 3
October 2017, Week 2
October 2017, Week 1
September 2017, Week 5
September 2017, Week 4
September 2017, Week 3
September 2017, Week 2
September 2017, Week 1
August 2017, Week 5
August 2017, Week 4
August 2017, Week 3
August 2017, Week 2
August 2017, Week 1
July 2017, Week 5
July 2017, Week 4
July 2017, Week 3
July 2017, Week 2
July 2017, Week 1
June 2017, Week 5
June 2017, Week 4
June 2017, Week 3
June 2017, Week 2
June 2017, Week 1
May 2017, Week 5
May 2017, Week 4
May 2017, Week 3
May 2017, Week 2
May 2017, Week 1
April 2017, Week 5
April 2017, Week 4
April 2017, Week 3
April 2017, Week 2
April 2017, Week 1
March 2017, Week 5
March 2017, Week 4
March 2017, Week 3
March 2017, Week 2
March 2017, Week 1
February 2017, Week 4
February 2017, Week 3
February 2017, Week 2
February 2017, Week 1
January 2017, Week 5
January 2017, Week 4
January 2017, Week 3
January 2017, Week 2
January 2017, Week 1
December 2016, Week 5
December 2016, Week 4
December 2016, Week 3
December 2016, Week 2
December 2016, Week 1
November 2016, Week 5
November 2016, Week 4
November 2016, Week 3
November 2016, Week 2
November 2016, Week 1
October 2016, Week 5
October 2016, Week 4
October 2016, Week 3
October 2016, Week 2
October 2016, Week 1
September 2016, Week 5
September 2016, Week 4
September 2016, Week 3
September 2016, Week 2
September 2016, Week 1
August 2016, Week 5
August 2016, Week 4
August 2016, Week 3
August 2016, Week 2
August 2016, Week 1
July 2016, Week 5
July 2016, Week 4
July 2016, Week 3
July 2016, Week 2
July 2016, Week 1
June 2016, Week 5
June 2016, Week 4
June 2016, Week 3
June 2016, Week 2
June 2016, Week 1
May 2016, Week 5
May 2016, Week 4
May 2016, Week 3
May 2016, Week 2
May 2016, Week 1
April 2016, Week 5
April 2016, Week 4
April 2016, Week 3
April 2016, Week 2
April 2016, Week 1
March 2016, Week 5
March 2016, Week 4
March 2016, Week 3
March 2016, Week 2
March 2016, Week 1
February 2016, Week 5
February 2016, Week 4
February 2016, Week 3
February 2016, Week 2
February 2016, Week 1
January 2016, Week 5
January 2016, Week 4
January 2016, Week 3
January 2016, Week 2
January 2016, Week 1
December 2015, Week 5
December 2015, Week 4
December 2015, Week 3
December 2015, Week 2
December 2015, Week 1
November 2015, Week 5
November 2015, Week 4
November 2015, Week 3
November 2015, Week 2
November 2015, Week 1
October 2015, Week 5
October 2015, Week 4
October 2015, Week 3
October 2015, Week 2
October 2015, Week 1
September 2015, Week 5
September 2015, Week 4
September 2015, Week 3
September 2015, Week 2
September 2015, Week 1
August 2015, Week 5
August 2015, Week 4
August 2015, Week 3
August 2015, Week 2
August 2015, Week 1
July 2015, Week 5
July 2015, Week 4
July 2015, Week 3
July 2015, Week 2
July 2015, Week 1
June 2015, Week 5
June 2015, Week 4
June 2015, Week 3
June 2015, Week 2
June 2015, Week 1
May 2015, Week 5
May 2015, Week 4
May 2015, Week 3
May 2015, Week 2
May 2015, Week 1
April 2015, Week 5
April 2015, Week 4
April 2015, Week 3
April 2015, Week 2
April 2015, Week 1
March 2015, Week 5
March 2015, Week 4
March 2015, Week 3
March 2015, Week 2
March 2015, Week 1
February 2015, Week 4
February 2015, Week 3
February 2015, Week 2
February 2015, Week 1
January 2015, Week 5
January 2015, Week 4
January 2015, Week 3
January 2015, Week 2
January 2015, Week 1
December 2014, Week 5
December 2014, Week 4
December 2014, Week 3
December 2014, Week 2
December 2014, Week 1
November 2014, Week 5
November 2014, Week 4
November 2014, Week 3
November 2014, Week 2
November 2014, Week 1
October 2014, Week 5
October 2014, Week 4
October 2014, Week 3
October 2014, Week 2
October 2014, Week 1
September 2014, Week 5
September 2014, Week 4
September 2014, Week 3
September 2014, Week 2
September 2014, Week 1
August 2014, Week 5
August 2014, Week 4
August 2014, Week 3
August 2014, Week 2
August 2014, Week 1
July 2014, Week 5
July 2014, Week 4
July 2014, Week 3
July 2014, Week 2
July 2014, Week 1
June 2014, Week 5
June 2014, Week 4
June 2014, Week 3
June 2014, Week 2
June 2014, Week 1
May 2014, Week 5
May 2014, Week 4
May 2014, Week 3
May 2014, Week 2
May 2014, Week 1
April 2014, Week 5
April 2014, Week 4
April 2014, Week 3
April 2014, Week 2
April 2014, Week 1
March 2014, Week 5
March 2014, Week 4
March 2014, Week 3
March 2014, Week 2
March 2014, Week 1
February 2014, Week 4
February 2014, Week 3
February 2014, Week 2
February 2014, Week 1
January 2014, Week 5
January 2014, Week 4
January 2014, Week 3
January 2014, Week 2
January 2014, Week 1
December 2013, Week 5
December 2013, Week 4
December 2013, Week 3
December 2013, Week 2
December 2013, Week 1
November 2013, Week 5
November 2013, Week 4
November 2013, Week 3
November 2013, Week 2
November 2013, Week 1
October 2013, Week 5
October 2013, Week 4
October 2013, Week 3
October 2013, Week 2
October 2013, Week 1
September 2013, Week 5
September 2013, Week 4
September 2013, Week 3
September 2013, Week 2
September 2013, Week 1
August 2013, Week 5
August 2013, Week 4
August 2013, Week 3
August 2013, Week 2
August 2013, Week 1
July 2013, Week 5
July 2013, Week 4
July 2013, Week 3
July 2013, Week 2
July 2013, Week 1
June 2013, Week 5
June 2013, Week 4
June 2013, Week 3
June 2013, Week 2
June 2013, Week 1
May 2013, Week 5
May 2013, Week 4
May 2013, Week 3
May 2013, Week 2
May 2013, Week 1
April 2013, Week 5
April 2013, Week 4
April 2013, Week 3
April 2013, Week 2
April 2013, Week 1
March 2013, Week 5
March 2013, Week 4
March 2013, Week 3
March 2013, Week 2
March 2013, Week 1
February 2013, Week 4
February 2013, Week 3
February 2013, Week 2
February 2013, Week 1
January 2013, Week 5
January 2013, Week 4
January 2013, Week 3
January 2013, Week 2
January 2013, Week 1
December 2012, Week 5
December 2012, Week 4
December 2012, Week 3
December 2012, Week 2
December 2012, Week 1
November 2012, Week 5
November 2012, Week 4
November 2012, Week 3
November 2012, Week 2
November 2012, Week 1
October 2012, Week 5
October 2012, Week 4
October 2012, Week 3
October 2012, Week 2
October 2012, Week 1
September 2012, Week 5
September 2012, Week 4
September 2012, Week 3
September 2012, Week 2
September 2012, Week 1
August 2012, Week 5
August 2012, Week 4
August 2012, Week 3
August 2012, Week 2
August 2012, Week 1
July 2012, Week 5
July 2012, Week 4
July 2012, Week 3
July 2012, Week 2
July 2012, Week 1
June 2012, Week 5
June 2012, Week 4
June 2012, Week 3
June 2012, Week 2
June 2012, Week 1
May 2012, Week 5
May 2012, Week 4
May 2012, Week 3
May 2012, Week 2
May 2012, Week 1
April 2012, Week 5
April 2012, Week 4
April 2012, Week 3
April 2012, Week 2
April 2012, Week 1
March 2012, Week 5
March 2012, Week 4
March 2012, Week 3
March 2012, Week 2
March 2012, Week 1
February 2012, Week 5
February 2012, Week 4
February 2012, Week 3
February 2012, Week 2
February 2012, Week 1
January 2012, Week 5
January 2012, Week 4
January 2012, Week 3
January 2012, Week 2
January 2012, Week 1
December 2011, Week 5
December 2011, Week 4
December 2011, Week 3
December 2011, Week 2
December 2011, Week 1
November 2011, Week 5
November 2011, Week 4
November 2011, Week 3
November 2011, Week 2
November 2011, Week 1
October 2011, Week 5
October 2011, Week 4
October 2011, Week 3
October 2011, Week 2
October 2011, Week 1
September 2011, Week 5
September 2011, Week 4
September 2011, Week 3
September 2011, Week 2
September 2011, Week 1
August 2011, Week 5
August 2011, Week 4
August 2011, Week 3
August 2011, Week 2
August 2011, Week 1
July 2011, Week 5
July 2011, Week 4
July 2011, Week 3
July 2011, Week 2
July 2011, Week 1
June 2011, Week 5
June 2011, Week 4
June 2011, Week 3
June 2011, Week 2
June 2011, Week 1
May 2011, Week 5
May 2011, Week 4
May 2011, Week 3
May 2011, Week 2
May 2011, Week 1
April 2011, Week 5
April 2011, Week 4
April 2011, Week 3
April 2011, Week 2
April 2011, Week 1
March 2011, Week 5
March 2011, Week 4
March 2011, Week 3
March 2011, Week 2
March 2011, Week 1
February 2011, Week 4
February 2011, Week 3
February 2011, Week 2
February 2011, Week 1
January 2011, Week 5
January 2011, Week 4
January 2011, Week 3
January 2011, Week 2
January 2011, Week 1
December 2010, Week 5
December 2010, Week 4
December 2010, Week 3
December 2010, Week 2
December 2010, Week 1
November 2010, Week 5
November 2010, Week 4
November 2010, Week 3
November 2010, Week 2
November 2010, Week 1
October 2010, Week 5
October 2010, Week 4
October 2010, Week 3
October 2010, Week 2
October 2010, Week 1
September 2010, Week 5
September 2010, Week 4
September 2010, Week 3
September 2010, Week 2
September 2010, Week 1
August 2010, Week 5
August 2010, Week 4
August 2010, Week 3
August 2010, Week 2
August 2010, Week 1
July 2010, Week 5
July 2010, Week 4
July 2010, Week 3
July 2010, Week 2
July 2010, Week 1

ATOM RSS1 RSS2



LISTS.PORTSIDE.ORG

CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager