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PORTSIDE  May 2012, Week 1

PORTSIDE May 2012, Week 1

Subject:

European Elections

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Date:

Sun, 6 May 2012 23:59:44 -0400

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(1)
François Hollande Wins French Presidential Election
Nicolas Sarkozy concedes defeat to Socialist party 
candidate, who has become first leftwing president 
in almost 20 years
Angelique Chrisafis in Paris
The Guardian
6 May 2012
http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2012/may/06/francois-hollande-wins-french-election
 
François Hollande has won power in France, turning the
tide on a rightwards and xenophobic lurch in European
politics and vowing to transform Europe's handling of
the economic crisis by fighting back against German-led
austerity measures.

The 57-year-old rural MP and self-styled Mr Normal, a
moderate social democrat from the centre of the
Socialist party, is France's first leftwing president in
almost 20 years. Projections from early counts, released
by French TV, put his score at 51.9%.

His emphatic victory is a boost to the left in a
continent that has gradually swung rightwards since the
economic crisis broke four years ago.

Nicolas Sarkozy, defeated after one term in office,
became the 11th European leader to lose power since the
economic crisis in 2008.

He conceded defeat at a gathering of his party activists
at the Mutualité in central Paris, urging them from the
stage to stop booing Hollande. "I carry all the
responsibility for this defeat," he said.

He had spoken to Hollande to congratulate him. "From the
bottom of my heart I want France to succeed with the
challenges it faces. It is something much greater than
us; France. This evening we must think exclusively of
France."

He said that after 35 years in politics and 10 years at
the top of government, he would now become a simple
"Frenchman among the French".

The defeat of the most unpopular French president ever
to run for re-election was not simply the result of the
global financial crisis or eurozone debt turmoil. It was
also down to the intense public dislike of the man
viewed by many as the "president of the rich" who had
swept to victory in 2007 with a huge mandate to change
France. The majority of French people felt he had failed
to deliver on his promises, and he was criticised for
his ostentatious display of wealth, favouring the rich
and leaving behind over 2.8 million unemployed.
Political analysts said anti-Sarkozy sentiment had
become a cultural phenomenon in France.

Hollande is the first Socialist president to win a
French election since François Mitterrand's re-election
in 1988. Hours before the official announcement, hordes
of cheering supporters began gathering at Paris's Place
de la Bastille, a flashpoint of the 1789 French
revolution, where the left had celebrated Mitterrand's
first historic victory in 1981. The right has held the
French presidency since Jacques Chirac's victory in
1995.

Hollande's first move as president will be to push
Germany to renegotiate Europe's budget discipline pact
to include a clause on growth. He has vowed to push
growth measures to the centre of Brussels' handling of
the eurozone crisis.

Ségolène Royal, Hollande's former partner who was
defeated by Sarkozy in 2007, said France had voted for
change and a new approach to European economic policy.
Manuel Valls, tipped for a cabinet post, said Hollande
now had to reconcile a France that had been divided
during Sarkozy's term.

Hollande's victory comes after a brutal and vitriolic
campaign marked by the high score of the farright Front
National's Marine Le Pen, who came third in the first
round with 17.9% and 6.4m votes. Sarkozy, who had
launched his campaign in February with a marked
rightwing slant on the values of work, family and
national identity, lurched even further towards the
extreme right as he courted Le Pen's voters in the past
two weeks, stressing the far-right topics of
immigration, borders and fear of Islam.

Hollande, who has vowed to begin his reforms as soon as
he takes office on 15 May, has accepted he will have "no
state of grace" leading a country crippled by public
debt and in economic crisis, with unemployment nudging a
record 10%, a gaping trade-deficit, stuttering growth
and declining industry. France's public debt is so high
that interest repayments alone account for the second
highest state expenditure after education.

The rating agency Standards and Poors this year
downgraded France's triple-A credit rating, saying that
over-high state spending was straining public finances.
During the campaign, both Hollande and Sarkozy had
promised to balance the books, - France hasn't had a
balanced budget for over 30 years.

Hollande's manifesto is based on scrapping Sarkozy's
tax-breaks for the rich and putting up taxes for high
earners to finance what he deems essential spending,
including creating 60,000 posts in France's under-
performing school system. He has pledged to keep the
public deficit capped, but for his delicate balancing
act to work, he needs a swift return to growth in
France, despite economists warning of over-optimistic
official growth forecasts that need to be trimmed.

Asked on Friday what he would do if he loses, Sarkozy
said simply: "There will be a handover of power. The
nation follows its course. The nation is stronger than
the destiny of the men who serve it," he said.

The turn-out was high, estimated at around 80%.

(2)
Greek Elections: Exit Polls Point to Drubbing For
Major Parties

New Democracy and Pasok see support drop dramatically,
as voters turn to parties who had opposed austerity 
measures
Helena Smith in Athens
The Guardian
6 May 2012
http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2012/may/06/greek-elections-exit-polls-parties

Governing parties backing EU-mandated austerity in
Greece are on course for a major drubbing as hard-hit
voters, venting their fury in elections, defected in
droves, according to exit polls.

In a major upset that will not be welcomed by the
crisis-plagued country's eurozone partners, the two
forces that had agreed to enact unpopular belt-
tightening in return for rescue funds appeared headed
for a beating, with none being able to form a
government.

After nearly 40 years of dominating the Greek political
scene, the centre-right New Democracy and socialist
Pasok saw support drop dramatically in favour of parties
that had virulently opposed the tough austerity dictated
by international creditors.

The latest figures showed New Democracy leading with
between 19 - 20.5% of the vote, followed by the radical
leftist party, Syriza, with as much as 17% and socialist
party Pasok with between 13 - 14 %. And for the first
time since the collapse of military rule, ultra-
nationalists were also set to enter parliament with
polls showing the neo-Nazi Chrysi Avgi (Golden Dawn)
capturing as much as 8%.

With the nation wrestling its worst crisis in modern
times, the big winner appeared to be Syriza, which had
campaigned ardently against austerity and was poised to
become the second biggest party in Athens's 300-seat
House.

A Metron analysis poll showed the leftists gaining as
much as 18.5%, more than the mainstream Pasok lead by
former finance minister Evangelos Venizelos, who
negotiated the latest ?130bn (£105bn) loan agreement
reached between Athens and the EU and IMF.

"That agreement now belongs to the past. It has been
delegitimised," said Panaghiotis Lafazanis, a prominent
Syriza MP. "Our strong showing sends a message
especially to Europe that Greeks have rejected
austerity."

Lafazanis said Syriza would keep to its pre-election
pledge to form a government of "the united left" that
would work to stop the fiscal remedies meted out to
Athens by its EU partners.

The election, called by Lucas Papademos, the technocrat
prime minister overseeing an emergency coalition for the
past six months, is the most critical in decades. Not
since the restoration of democracy in 1974 has so much
been at stake, with politicians and analysts alike
saying Greece's political stability and future in the
eurozone would rest on the result.

The significance of the moment did not appear to be lost
on Greeks. From early in the morning voters, many
dressed in Sunday best, filed into the thousands of
public schools serving as polling stations.

"I hope my vote will be for the good of my country,"
said Georgios Kladis, holding his grandson's hand.
"Greece has to be governed. I hope that will be possible
tomorrow."

Although elections are traditionally seen as a joyous
affair, the pinnacle of democracy for a deeply
politicised nation, volunteer lawyers working as
election monitors in Athens reported voters as being in
sombre mood. Many were said to have spent an
"inordinately long time" in curtained-off booths before
deciding which candidate to back.

Visibly moved, Fotis Kouvelis, who heads the small
Democratic Left party, said: "We are voting to keep
Greece alive and society intact."

"People are clearly troubled," observed Dimitris
Anastasopoulos, a monitor at a polling station in one of
the capital's leafy northern suburbs. "We've had some in
booths for 10 minutes. It's got to the point where we've
had to remind them there is a queue outside."

Pulling up at another polling station on his bicycle in
shorts and sandals, Orestis Papadopoulos said he was
excited to be among the 110,000 Greeks voting for the
first time. "If you asked me whether I'd vote even a few
months back I would have said 'bah, no way,'" he said.
"But this is critical. First they put a pistol to our
heads, now they're shoving it down our throats. All this
austerity has been for nothing. It doesn't work. And I
want to add my voice to those people saying 'no'."

Maria Stasini, 43, emerging from a polling station in
central Athens, was also voting against the austerity
measures. "It was a purely anti-austerity vote because
all these measures have killed us," she said.

"My son has been unemployed for the past two years. He
has sent out 400 emails and hasn't got even one reply.

"My husband is a plasterer and work for him has dropped
by 80%. On top of everything, they pummel us with
taxes," she said, adding she had been forced to close
her restaurant last year.

"We were all New Democracy voters but how can we vote
for them now when they, too, back such measures?"

(3)
Italy Goes To The Polls In Local Elections
Elections across 900 towns in Italy represent first test 
for Mario Monti's austerity measures
The Guardian
6 May 2012
http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2012/may/06/italy-local-elections-mario-monti

Italians have gone to the polls in local elections that
will provide the first test of voter resistance to Prime
Minister Mario Monti's increasingly unpopular austerity
policies since his appointment last year.

Monti is not in the race, but for the two main parties
which support his technocrat government in parliament,
Sunday's vote will be a barometer of support ahead of
national elections next year.

Both the centre-right PDL and the centre-left PD are
jockeying for position ahead of the 2013 vote but face
an increasingly sceptical electorate which has been
bitterly resentful of tax hikes imposed by the Monti
government.

With national elections in France and Greece and an
important state election in Germany on the same day, the
vote will help provide one of the most comprehensive
snapshots of popular mood across Europe since the
outbreak of the financial crisis.

More than 9 million Italians, or nearly 20% of the total
electorate, are eligible to vote in the elections in
around 900 towns across Italy, including important
provincial centres such as Palermo, Genoa and Verona.

An opinion poll on Friday showed the PD leading the PDL,
but more than 38% of respondents were either undecided
or ready to abstain. The same poll suggested that Beppe
Grillo, a maverick comedian who wants Italy to leave the
euro and default on its debt, would capture the third
biggest share of the vote.

Polling stations opened at 8am on Sunday, with
preliminary results expected after voting closes at 3pm
on Monday.

(4)
After Upsets In France And Greece, German Coalition 
Suffers Defeat
Schleswig-Holstein result caps a miserable night 
for Angela Merkel in her country as well as Europe
Ian Traynor, Europe editor
The Guardian
6 May 2012
http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2012/may/06/elections-france-greece-germany-angela-merkel

Angela Merkel's coalition of Christian Democrats and
liberal Free Democrats lost a state election in northern
Germany on Sunday, a week ahead of a much bigger
regional ballot further west.

The election, in the northern state of Schleswig-
Holstein bordering Denmark, brought gains for the
opposition Social Democrats (SPD) and losses for
Merkel's CDU, while the Greens and newcomer Pirate party
also fared well and the liberal FDP slumped.

The result sealed a miserable evening for Merkel, both
at home and in Europe. France elected a president
pledged to challenge the German leader on the central
precepts of her eurozone crisis management strategy.

The Greek election threw up an uncertain and
destabilising outcome likely to raise further questions
about Greece's ability to comply with the stringent
terms of two eurozone bailouts. Merkel's position in
Europe has been weakened recently by the collapse of her
allied government in the Netherlands. Last night she
also lost her main European colleague, Nicolas Sarkozy.

The defeat in Schleswig-Holstein of the same coalition
she heads at the German national level comes a week
before a much bigger bellwether poll in the state of
North Rhine-Westphalia. The SPD and the Greens are also
tipped to do well there.

Merkel's CDU narrowly remained the biggest party in the
northern state, while its coalition partner slumped by
almost half to 8%. But that FDP result was seen as a
success following a string of disastrous regional
results that resulted in it being drummed out of state
parliaments.

The main opposition SPD gained almost five points to
come within one point of the Christian Democrats. The
Greens also gained slightly to about 15% while the
maverick Pirates took 8% of the vote, complicating the
attempts starting today to construct a viable new
coalition. The haggling could take a while, with the
favourite options being a Social Democrat-led government
with the Greens and a small party representing the
Danish minority, or Merkel's CDU remaining in office in
a "grand coalition" with the SPD.

The elections next Sunday in North Rhine-Westphalia,
whose population of 24 million is bigger than those of
many European countries, will be a much more important
test for Merkel.

On what was an extremely busy day for voters all across
Europe, elections also opened for local authorities in
about 900 towns in Italy. They continue on Monday and
are seen as an early gauge of the popularity of the
reformist, caretaker government of Mario Monti following
the collapse of Silvio Berlusconi's discredited
administration last November.

Outside the EU in the Balkans, presidential,
parliamentary, and local elections were held in Serbia
and produced conflicting results. The incumbent
president, Boris Tadic, came out narrowly ahead of his
more nationalist challenger, Tomislav Nikolic, in the
key contest for the presidency, meaning that the two men
will stage a run-off in a fortnight.

But in the parliamentary ballot, Nikolic's Progressive
party beat Tadic's Democrats into second place,
according to partial vote counts. The result appeared to
leave the third-placed Socialists, party of the late war
crimes suspect and president Slobodan Milosevic, as
king-maker, with its leader, Ivica Dacic, tipped to be
the new prime minister.

Despite worries about staging the elections in the
breakaway country of Kosovo - Nato troops were
reinforced and international election organisers
dispatched - the balloting there passed off without much
incident.

___________________________________________

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on the left that will help them to interpret the world
and to change it.

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