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PORTSIDE  August 2010, Week 2

PORTSIDE August 2010, Week 2

Subject:

Tidbits - August 12, 2010

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Tidbits - August 12, 2010

* Continued Discussion - Re: The Stalled Peace Movement(??)
  Call for ongoing discussion on building the most effective
  peace movement possible 
* More Reader Responses (responses from Jack Radey and David 
  McReynolds 
* The Weapons Business is Booming (Kurt Mellenthin in Junge 
  Welt) 
* Re: Labor's Role in the Obama Era: A Troublesome and 
  Unreliable Ally? -- An Exchange (L.S. MacDowell) 
* Re: Bread Without Bosses (R Zwarich)
* Exporting Green Jobs Dept: If You want to Know Why Worker-
  Owned Factories Are Better.... (Carl Davidson)
* Preserving the legacy of GI Resistance (James Lewes)

==========

* Continued Discussion - Re: The Stalled Peace Movement(??)
- More Reader Responses (responses from Jack Radey and David
McReynolds

[Moderator's Note - There has been considerable reader
feedback to the various postings on portside on the current
status of the peace movement. Below are two additional
posts. Portside asks readers to continue to submit their
ideas and views as to how to build the most effective peace
movement possible, a movement that will force the withdrawal
of all U.S. troops from Afghanistan and Iraq.]

===

Here's a little more from another graying veteran of the
antiwar movement during Vietnam.  We had some real
advantages back then that the movement lacks today: 1) We
had nearly ten years of watching how a group of courageous
people could oppose injustice and official violence and win.
The current generation has no Civil Rights movement to learn
from.  There are lots of movements; but none in the national
spotlight with the clear courageous righteousness that
allowed the movement to gain such wide support and actually
move things.

2) We were part of a time when all over the world people
were making advances towards liberation.  The tide seemed to
be running our way, despite everything, and it looked like a
brighter day ahead.  Optimism about the future I'm afraid is
a sad relic of our past.  I know, I know, you have to be
optimistic to be a revolutionary (Ho Chi Minh), and
pessimism is its own reward, but it sure is hard to sell a
bright future to kids today.

3) We had that big numbers bulge, the Baby Boomers.  Along
with the numbers was the fact that we surprised the
opposition, who just were continuously underestimating our
appeal, strength, and numbers.  To be frank, we scared the
hell out of them, and we frightened both Lyndon Johnson and
Richard Nixon out of some of their more aggressive plans.
While some of the "wild-in-the-streets" (yeah, been there,
done that) tactics were not really all that tactically
effective, they, and the riots in the ghettos, really did
scare the authorities.

4) The police were nowhere near as militarized, armed and
dangerous as they are today.  And they usually would avoid
things like trying to prevent peaceful marches (which we
have seen in the last ten years in NYC and Minneapolis).

5) Finally, and I know someone out there will groan, but the
fact is that when there was a socialist camp, no matter how
divided and (for good reason) cautious, it served as a real
restraint on the actions of the US empire.  One reason the
Civil Rights movement could achieve success was fear that
the US would lose the struggle for popular support in the
3rd World if Jim Crow wasn't ended.  Fear of Soviet and/or
Chinese responses also stayed the hand of the Pentagon. Now
the notion that the US should dominate the world is kind of
a given for many here.  It is assumed by too many people
that we are SUPPOSED to run the world.

All that said, there is much to be learned from our
experiences that we need to share with today's somewhat
demoralized peace warriors.

Jack Radey

 ===

It doesn't matter if these comments get sent on or not, but
I'll post them to my own disarmament list.

There is no easy answer to anything political, but one of
the charges that has been made (largely by the Trotskyists
and "neo-Trotskyists") has been that the Communist Party and
those close to it were not willing to tackle anything that
would damage Obama.

As someone who has only abandoned a pretty rigid "anti-
Communist" position in recent years - by which I realize I
mean the past twenty five or thirty years (as one ages,
"recent years" takes on a different meaning) I think we had
a situation where the scenario that differed from the
Vietnam period (and also the struggle against nuclear
weapons) was almost accidental.

During the Vietnam War I don't think any of us imagined it
would last for ten years. It was so bloody awful, so
foolish, so counter-productive, that each "event", each
"mobilization" was pulled together for just one season. We
would have the Spring Mobilization Against the War, the
National Mobilization, etc. But NEVER did the loose
coalition of groups involved think about getting a permanent
office and national staff.

Each time we would go through a complex song and dance of
pulling together AFSC, the Freeze, Trotskyists, Communists,
independents and academics, the various pacifist groups, and
rent office space in Washington and hire staff. (The
pacifists were able, through Brad Lyttle, to make sure that
in most cases we had a key person on the national staff, the
other key person being from the SWP or CP).

There was thus never a bureaucracy. At no point could the
group I worked with - War Resisters League - feel the issue
of Vietnam would be addressed by some vague national
coalition. It had to be on OUR agenda, and ditto for FOR,
AFSC, CALC, etc. All these groups had to come together,
fight it out, and arrange for the event, the strategy.

Nor was the anti-war movement that swiftly set up - it took
more than two years to begin to get in gear. And YES the
draft was important. And so was the media - THE WAR WAS IN
OUT FRONT ROOMS thanks to TV and the fact the media hadn't
been "embedded". (The military studied Vietnam, and us, and
changed their tactics).

When the Vietnam War was over the peace movement we had
known simply collapsed. Younger folks do not realize what a
drain it had been on the lives of people who had poured
themselves into the movement and suddenly - WHAM - it was
over. Yes, we had the problem of the Euro-Missiles, but that
wasn't enough. No draft, no TV of daily death tools.

Then came 9.11 and the crazy invasions of Afghanistan and
Iraq. We all were happy to organize things through UFPJ,
which on the one hand seemed great (and Leslie Cagan did a
splendid job) but which meant that groups such as AFSC or
FOR or WRL could feel it wasn't absolutely top priority - we
would just wait to see what UFPJ was suggesting.

Then out of nowhere came the Obama campaign. I didn't vote
for Obama (I voted Green, because I knew he would carry New
York State) but one has to be really deeply sectarian (or
maybe just terribly politically correct) not to see why this
campaign gripped people. It was against the war, against
Guantanamo, and it was a black man in a racist America. The
fact Obama could never have gotten the nomination if he had
truly been against the Establishment was only clear to weary
old radicals like myself.  Thank God that people still had
hope!

The argument that the CP (battered by the dissolution of
the Soviet Union, down to a tiny handful of the faithful)
put the movement on hold - that is nuts. EVERYONE "put the
movement on hold", hoping Obama would do what he had
promised. (Somehow a lot of folks forgot that Obama had
promised to expand the war in Afghanistan). It was
convenient for that odd "shadow organization", Workers World
Party (since split into two groups, but never having more
than a few hundred members) to form fronts such as the
International Action Center, blame the Communist Party (!!)
for not doing enough. It was ALWAYS a mistake to spend ten
minutes trying to work in good faith with WWP.

Where do we go now? I don't know. Perhaps Albany provides
part of an answer. But I know that we all share the blame,
and that I wish the peace groups would have some informal
off the record caucus, without Socialist Action, to take up
this question. We used to do this as a matter of course. I
don't think (let's hope I'm just out of touch and am wrong)
we have done it lately.

David McReynolds

==========

* The Weapons Business is Booming

By Kurt Mellenthin

American corporations are pumping billions of dollars worth
of weapons into the Middle East.

Translated By Ron Argentati

Watching America

8 August 2010

http://watchingamerica.com/News/64257/the-weapons-business-
is-booming/

[Original article: Die Tagezeitung Junge Welt August 8, 2010
http://www.jungewelt.de/2010/08-11/060.php ]

U.S. plans to sell more arms to Saudi Arabia are causing
concern in Israel. That's at least the assertion being made
by the Wall Street Journal in its latest Sunday edition. The
newspaper is a mouthpiece for both the U.S. pro-Israel lobby
and neo-conservatives. Neither of these groups had
previously expressed any concern over the matter, and
neither had their congressional representatives nor the
Israeli government voiced any objection to the deal. The WSJ
report was based solely on anonymous sources and appears to
be motivated by special interest groups.

According to the WSJ, the U.S. government intends to sell 84
Boeing F-15 fighter jets to the Saudis. This model was first
put into service in 1976, so it's basically aircraft that is
being replaced by more advanced aircraft, though it has been
modernized and improved over the years. The WSJ says the 84
planes are part of a 10-year upgrade program worth $30
million in total. Saudi Arabia will probably also purchase
several dozen UH-60 Black Hawk attack helicopters as well.
The newspaper reports that Israel expressed concern about
the planned sale of the F-15 fighters and was successful in
preventing the Saudis from gaining access to the most
advanced version of the fighter -- especially one with long-
range missile capabilities.

The concept of weapons sales to the Saudis and other nations
in the Arabian Peninsula was started by George W. Bush, and
it has been continued by his successor. The impetus behind
this policy is the supposed threat posed to the region by
Iran, whose armed forces have no meaningful offensive
capabilities. The planned deliveries, which have already
begun, mean a win-win situation for the U.S. armaments
industry: according to agreements already long in effect,
the United States unconditionally and perpetually guarantees
Israeli military superiority in the region. The deals with
Arab states, therefore, automatically assure that Israel
will receive additional counterbalancing weaponry, a part of
which is paid for by American taxpayers.

In reality, it appears the reports were instigated by the
WSJ in order to provide Israel justification for its own
armaments wishes. Israel had planned to buy 75 F-35 Joint
Strike Fighters -- a model already superior to the most
modern version of the F-15 -- but, because of the high cost,
currently it can only afford 20 of these aircraft. By
publicizing the deal, the WSJ could be trying to toss a
monkey wrench into the machinery so that Israel gets a
larger number of F-35 aircraft, free of charge.

Official American and Israeli war propaganda is based on the
supposedly widespread fear the "moderate Arab" states have
of Iran. The latest opinion polls show that this myth is
supported only by the attitude of Arab countries, not one of
which is legitimized by a democratic government. The survey
was conducted by the American Brookings Institute in Egypt,
Jordan, Lebanon, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates.
Fifty-seven percent of those surveyed even said they would
view a nuclear Iran to be a positive development for the
region. One year ago, only 29 percent held that opinion, and
where 40 percent then believed that increased pressure on
Iran to abandon its nuclear ambitions was the best way to
go, only 20 percent now hold that opinion.

==========

* Re: Labor's Role in the Obama Era: A Troublesome and
Unreliable Ally? -- An Exchange

This article is a load of hogwash. The most important thing
for labour is to help Obama win a second term. They may be
disappointed that some things they support were not won, but
at least they can still talk to and advise the president. In
the Bush years, they had no access at all to the White
House. It may be once Obama is installed in his second term,
labour can become more demanding and even oppositional if it
is in their organizational interest but not now.

The strength of various aspects of the right is amazing and
if the Republicans gain borth houses of congress, nothing
will be done to deal with many issues, including global
issues such as climate change. Already corporations are
lining up to give large amounts of money to the Republicans.
The Democrats need people to vote and the labour movement's
organizational abilities can help them get the voters to the
polls.

Has Lictenstein forgotten how bleak the political landscape
was since Reagan? Hard to believe.

L.S. MacDowell

==========

* Re: Bread Without Bosses

It's a shame that Portside chose to publish this shallow
fluff piece from the Socialist Webzine. The interviewer
unfortunately chose to ignore all the substantive responses
that deserved more in-depth exploration, which might have
made an examination of the business structure and practices
of the Alvarado Street Bakery into a valuable informative
exercise for people interested in what they call
"socialism".

The most evocative and substantive passage by far in Joseph
Tuck's responses was this:

"Our initial collective form (and low flat pay for all)
needed to evolve to the system we now employ. This was
necessary for us to do to stay in business. All changes were
not universally agreed upon and in fact, there were some
very fractious years during the time of change. It was not
easy for the membership to change wage policy or delegate
power. However, these changes are the real reasons why we
all have prospered as a worker cooperative."

....but the interviewer passes by it completely with zero
follow up, choosing instead to segue into a vapid
'celebrity' question concerning the mention of ASB in a
movie, (which Mr. Tuck explained had little to no impact on
the enterprise).

The entire article does not mention that Mr. Tuck holds the
formal title of Chief Executive Officer of this corporation.
Nor does it explore what "changes" were made to ASB's
"initial collective form (and low flat pay for all)", to
which Mr. Tuck was referring in his comments, or what
policies were adopted to "change wage policy" and "delegate
power", or why these changes were necessary to "prosper.. as
a worker cooperative".

In my own experience, (as a leftist who ran a small
contracting business for many years), most of the people who
espouse what they call "socialism" have little (if any)
understanding of the realities and problems involved in
running an economic enterprise. They tend to think that
'management' is a parasitic structure that lives on the
backs of workers. (Indeed, accompanying this article on its
website, Socialist Webzine includes a video essay that
declares exactly that). They have little understanding that
good management is crucial to the success of any business,
and that relatively few workers have the skills required to
be good managers, nor the desire to take upon themselves the
constant 'headaches' of which management consists. The key
concept that would-be "socialists" tend to want to ignore is
that the inherent value to the enterprise of key individual
management personnel is inherently higher than that of
individual 'line workers'. Although it is not revealed in
this shallow article, my guess is that the changes that ASB
adopted in order to prosper reflected that ineluctable
reality in some way.

This is a hard reality that few who call themselves
"socialists" are willing to explore or understand, and a
major reason why so few are able to take them seriously. If
Socialism (whatever is meant by this concept) offers to
provide us an answer to our crushing problems, it must do so
by facing the hard realities of these problems square on,
not by presenting us with a make- believe world in which all
'workers' are virtuous, and equally endowed with various
potential skills.

It would have been much more informative for the interviewer
to explore the changes that ASB has adopted. What is the
current pay structure of the company? How much do Mr. Tuck,
and others who shoulder various levels of responsibility,
(i.e.: to whom power is delegated), in the management
hierarchy, earn in relation to the earnings of those who do
the physical work of mixing dough, etc? Whatever pay
structure that ASB has adopted, why does Mr. Tuck think it
has been "necessary for us to do to stay in business"? How
does the ASB corporate structure incorporate democratic
principles to limit the powers of management and guard the
interests of workers? How are the workers empowered as
'citizens' and 'owners' of the corporation? How do the
corporate bylaws protect their democratic rights, and how is
their ownership endowed? Do they own stock? If so, what
rules govern the acquisition and ownership of the stock? Can
they sell it if they so choose, and if so, to whom? How are
the enterprise's profits apportioned? How are ongoing
capital needs met? (Etc. Etc.)

These are the type of questions that should have been asked
if the interviewer's purpose was to inform us as to the hard
realities of running a cooperatively owned enterprise. It
seems clear that the intent of Socialist Webzine was to
create a light- weight propaganda piece, not a serious and
scientific consideration of the subject at hand.

Many people who call themselves "socialists" seem to be
unwilling to confront the hard realities that such questions
uncover. The fluffy slant of this article is certainly in
keeping with that. Cooperative ownership of economic
enterprises could contribute significantly to a re-ordered
and more just society. But that cannot (and will not) happen
unless we face and understand the hard realities involved.

We don't need some dreamy phantasmagoric "socialism" geared
to a theoretical make-believe world, folks. We need a socio-
economic political system that can confront he realities of
the world we actually live in.

R Zwarich

==========

* Exporting Green Jobs Dept: If You want to Know Why Worker-
Owned Factories Are Better....

If you want to know why worker-owned factories are a better
idea, here's why. They're far less likely to liquidate their
own jobs to create maximum profits. All they have to do is
run in the black and maintain market share.

Carl Davidson

	Green Jobs That Can Be Outsourced
	
	Washington Wire - Wall Street Journal
	August 11, 2010
	http://blogs.wsj.com/washwire/2010/08/11/green-jobs-that-can-be-outsourced/

	President Obama promotes federal subsidies for the
	renewable energy industry, saying they will create
	"the jobs of the future, jobs that pay well and
	can't be outsourced."

	But some green jobs can be outsourced, as Michigan
	solar cell maker Energy Conversion Devices, Inc.,
	demonstrated Tuesday.

	ECD said it will move final assembly of some of its
	existing solar cell products out of an Auburn Hills,
	Mich. plant to Tijuana, Mexico. The decision means
	140 of ECD's Michigan workers will be out of a job
	this fall, the company says. About 750 ECD jobs will
	remain in Michigan, it says...

	ECD says it's pushing ahead with plans to use the
	$13 million stimulus tax credit it received to
	upgrade other parts of its Auburn Hills operations
	to produce a new, more efficient line of solar
	cells. When ECD announced the Department of Energy
	award, it said the $42 million project would create
	about 600 additional jobs in Michigan...
	
	Full story at: 
http://blogs.wsj.com/washwire/2010/08/11/green-jobs-that-can-be-outsourced/

==========

* Preserving the legacy of GI Resistance

    For many years the Swarthmore College Peace Collection
    has been collecting the newspapers and newsletters
    created by GIs protesting against war and the conditions
    under which they served. By publishing stories and
    voices never heard in the mainstream press or the
    alternative anti-war movement press, these papers ...
    [uniquely] ... reflect the charged relationship between
    enlisted men and draftees with the institution
    commanding every aspect of their lives . Scanning these
    important historical documents will make this material
    accessible to a large, and international audience .
    [and] . the voices of those GIs heard once more. I
    applaud James Lewes' efforts to get this work off the
    ground. (Wendy Chmielewski, George Cooley Curator,
    Swarthmore College Peace Collection)

The GI Press Project has one simple goal, to uncover and
preserve -- without ideological bias -- all remaining anti-
war manifestoes, newspapers, pamphlets and posters produced
by active duty servicemen and veterans during the Vietnam-
War. These rare and fragile newspapers and pamphlets, that
provide irrefutable evidence of the breadth, and depth, of
active duty opposition to the wars in Vietnam, Cambodia and
Laos, are in danger of disintegrating and crumbling to dust.
If nothing is done to preserve this incomparable primary
source, it will become impossible to reconstruct the debates
that animated the GI Press and the actions of the GI
movement on which it reported.

To preserve this amazing and historically valuable resource
I have created The GI Press Project.  The GI Press Project
has already garnered interest and support from veterans,
activists, and academics. Working evenings, weekends, and
days off, I have already scanned and saved to DVD more than
350 newspapers and pamphlets. These include complete runs of
10 papers - including Aboveground, Om, RITA Act, The
Ultimate Weapon and Vietnam GI - as well as partial runs of
more than 70 other titles. Once scanned each issue may be
viewed on the computer screen and/or reprinted at the size
originally published. The individual pages of these papers
are saved as high quality scans. The GI Press Project will
achieve its mission when it is partnered with an
archive/special collection that can make these materials
accessible on the web.  It is my intention to make these
digital issues available as pdf files to anybody interested
in the Vietnam-era GI movement at a nominal fee.

The GI Press Project is housed near two of the largest
collections of original GI Movement materials in the
country. To devote the necessary time to scan these holdings
and fold them into to the GI Press Project, I have had to
adapt my schedule to the hours during which the archives are
open and quit the jobs that have funded the project thus
far. Consequently, I have to ask for your financial support
to make it possible to continue and complete this important
task.  While the condition of these newspapers and pamphlets
is not uniformly dire, a great many are starting to crumble
to dust. In the 1980s a number of GI titles were committed
to microfilm, in the belief this would preserve the material
for decades and the original copies were destroyed. The
remaining newspapers are housed, in complete and partial
runs, in various archives and special collections. Despite
the best efforts of archivists to preserve them, the acid
content of the paper is causing them to become brittle and
disintegrate.

Financially stretched, and swamped with appeals from worthy
causes, you might think the digitization of a couple of
hundred newspapers and pamphlets a luxury that can wait.
This is not the case. Because the monies you give to the GI
Press Project will be used to digitize these remaining,
fragile newspapers and pamphlets in full color, and at the
size they were originally printed, scholars and historians
will no longer be at the mercy of the often poor quality of
microfilm.

As Dr. Howard Levy commented in the documentary film Sir! No
Sir!, there are not many times when people can act to try to
change the course of history and be successful in doing so.
The voices and actions of Howard Levy and thousands of other
GIs must be preserved and hopefully provide a road map to
current and future activists on how to stop the war machine
in its tracks and force it to change course. By contributing
to the GI Press Project, your money will enable this to be
done.

With a staff of one, this project needs less than $1000 a
month and an untold amount of sweat equity to be completed.
While it would be nice to be able to rely on the assistance
of interns and volunteers, the project rests on my
shoulders, a burden I am proud to bear.

Our affiliation with Veterans For Peace Chapter 31, an
independent 501(c)(3), allows donors to deduct their
contributions to the GI Press Project from their taxes.
Given the fact the U.S. Government is spending more than one
hundred million dollars a day on the wars in Iraq and
Afghanistan, this project's estimated budget is less than
the military wastes on these wars in the time it took you to
read this proposal. However it is comforting to know that
every dollar you donate to the GI Press Project is a dollar
that cannot be used to aid and abet these wars.

At the present time contributions to the GI Press Project
may be made payable to: Veterans for Peace Chapter 31, and
sent to  Thompson Bradley, 11 Price's Lane, Rose Valley, PA
19065, with a note stating they are to be directed to the GI
Press Project.

If you have questions about, or suggestions for, the
project, please contact by email at
[log in to unmask] or [log in to unmask]

If you have copies of newspapers and pamphlets you would
like me to digitize and add to the project, please send them
to James Lewes, 4235 Sansom St., Philadelphia, PA 19104.
These will be returned to you or deposited with an archive
as you request.

If you can think of persons that would be interested in
aiding this important project please forward this request to
them.

Yours Truly

James Lewes, PhD
<[log in to unmask]>

=========

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March 2017, Week 1
February 2017, Week 4
February 2017, Week 3
February 2017, Week 2
February 2017, Week 1
January 2017, Week 5
January 2017, Week 4
January 2017, Week 3
January 2017, Week 2
January 2017, Week 1
December 2016, Week 5
December 2016, Week 4
December 2016, Week 3
December 2016, Week 2
December 2016, Week 1
November 2016, Week 5
November 2016, Week 4
November 2016, Week 3
November 2016, Week 2
November 2016, Week 1
October 2016, Week 5
October 2016, Week 4
October 2016, Week 3
October 2016, Week 2
October 2016, Week 1
September 2016, Week 5
September 2016, Week 4
September 2016, Week 3
September 2016, Week 2
September 2016, Week 1
August 2016, Week 5
August 2016, Week 4
August 2016, Week 3
August 2016, Week 2
August 2016, Week 1
July 2016, Week 5
July 2016, Week 4
July 2016, Week 3
July 2016, Week 2
July 2016, Week 1
June 2016, Week 5
June 2016, Week 4
June 2016, Week 3
June 2016, Week 2
June 2016, Week 1
May 2016, Week 5
May 2016, Week 4
May 2016, Week 3
May 2016, Week 2
May 2016, Week 1
April 2016, Week 5
April 2016, Week 4
April 2016, Week 3
April 2016, Week 2
April 2016, Week 1
March 2016, Week 5
March 2016, Week 4
March 2016, Week 3
March 2016, Week 2
March 2016, Week 1
February 2016, Week 5
February 2016, Week 4
February 2016, Week 3
February 2016, Week 2
February 2016, Week 1
January 2016, Week 5
January 2016, Week 4
January 2016, Week 3
January 2016, Week 2
January 2016, Week 1
December 2015, Week 5
December 2015, Week 4
December 2015, Week 3
December 2015, Week 2
December 2015, Week 1
November 2015, Week 5
November 2015, Week 4
November 2015, Week 3
November 2015, Week 2
November 2015, Week 1
October 2015, Week 5
October 2015, Week 4
October 2015, Week 3
October 2015, Week 2
October 2015, Week 1
September 2015, Week 5
September 2015, Week 4
September 2015, Week 3
September 2015, Week 2
September 2015, Week 1
August 2015, Week 5
August 2015, Week 4
August 2015, Week 3
August 2015, Week 2
August 2015, Week 1
July 2015, Week 5
July 2015, Week 4
July 2015, Week 3
July 2015, Week 2
July 2015, Week 1
June 2015, Week 5
June 2015, Week 4
June 2015, Week 3
June 2015, Week 2
June 2015, Week 1
May 2015, Week 5
May 2015, Week 4
May 2015, Week 3
May 2015, Week 2
May 2015, Week 1
April 2015, Week 5
April 2015, Week 4
April 2015, Week 3
April 2015, Week 2
April 2015, Week 1
March 2015, Week 5
March 2015, Week 4
March 2015, Week 3
March 2015, Week 2
March 2015, Week 1
February 2015, Week 4
February 2015, Week 3
February 2015, Week 2
February 2015, Week 1
January 2015, Week 5
January 2015, Week 4
January 2015, Week 3
January 2015, Week 2
January 2015, Week 1
December 2014, Week 5
December 2014, Week 4
December 2014, Week 3
December 2014, Week 2
December 2014, Week 1
November 2014, Week 5
November 2014, Week 4
November 2014, Week 3
November 2014, Week 2
November 2014, Week 1
October 2014, Week 5
October 2014, Week 4
October 2014, Week 3
October 2014, Week 2
October 2014, Week 1
September 2014, Week 5
September 2014, Week 4
September 2014, Week 3
September 2014, Week 2
September 2014, Week 1
August 2014, Week 5
August 2014, Week 4
August 2014, Week 3
August 2014, Week 2
August 2014, Week 1
July 2014, Week 5
July 2014, Week 4
July 2014, Week 3
July 2014, Week 2
July 2014, Week 1
June 2014, Week 5
June 2014, Week 4
June 2014, Week 3
June 2014, Week 2
June 2014, Week 1
May 2014, Week 5
May 2014, Week 4
May 2014, Week 3
May 2014, Week 2
May 2014, Week 1
April 2014, Week 5
April 2014, Week 4
April 2014, Week 3
April 2014, Week 2
April 2014, Week 1
March 2014, Week 5
March 2014, Week 4
March 2014, Week 3
March 2014, Week 2
March 2014, Week 1
February 2014, Week 4
February 2014, Week 3
February 2014, Week 2
February 2014, Week 1
January 2014, Week 5
January 2014, Week 4
January 2014, Week 3
January 2014, Week 2
January 2014, Week 1
December 2013, Week 5
December 2013, Week 4
December 2013, Week 3
December 2013, Week 2
December 2013, Week 1
November 2013, Week 5
November 2013, Week 4
November 2013, Week 3
November 2013, Week 2
November 2013, Week 1
October 2013, Week 5
October 2013, Week 4
October 2013, Week 3
October 2013, Week 2
October 2013, Week 1
September 2013, Week 5
September 2013, Week 4
September 2013, Week 3
September 2013, Week 2
September 2013, Week 1
August 2013, Week 5
August 2013, Week 4
August 2013, Week 3
August 2013, Week 2
August 2013, Week 1
July 2013, Week 5
July 2013, Week 4
July 2013, Week 3
July 2013, Week 2
July 2013, Week 1
June 2013, Week 5
June 2013, Week 4
June 2013, Week 3
June 2013, Week 2
June 2013, Week 1
May 2013, Week 5
May 2013, Week 4
May 2013, Week 3
May 2013, Week 2
May 2013, Week 1
April 2013, Week 5
April 2013, Week 4
April 2013, Week 3
April 2013, Week 2
April 2013, Week 1
March 2013, Week 5
March 2013, Week 4
March 2013, Week 3
March 2013, Week 2
March 2013, Week 1
February 2013, Week 4
February 2013, Week 3
February 2013, Week 2
February 2013, Week 1
January 2013, Week 5
January 2013, Week 4
January 2013, Week 3
January 2013, Week 2
January 2013, Week 1
December 2012, Week 5
December 2012, Week 4
December 2012, Week 3
December 2012, Week 2
December 2012, Week 1
November 2012, Week 5
November 2012, Week 4
November 2012, Week 3
November 2012, Week 2
November 2012, Week 1
October 2012, Week 5
October 2012, Week 4
October 2012, Week 3
October 2012, Week 2
October 2012, Week 1
September 2012, Week 5
September 2012, Week 4
September 2012, Week 3
September 2012, Week 2
September 2012, Week 1
August 2012, Week 5
August 2012, Week 4
August 2012, Week 3
August 2012, Week 2
August 2012, Week 1
July 2012, Week 5
July 2012, Week 4
July 2012, Week 3
July 2012, Week 2
July 2012, Week 1
June 2012, Week 5
June 2012, Week 4
June 2012, Week 3
June 2012, Week 2
June 2012, Week 1
May 2012, Week 5
May 2012, Week 4
May 2012, Week 3
May 2012, Week 2
May 2012, Week 1
April 2012, Week 5
April 2012, Week 4
April 2012, Week 3
April 2012, Week 2
April 2012, Week 1
March 2012, Week 5
March 2012, Week 4
March 2012, Week 3
March 2012, Week 2
March 2012, Week 1
February 2012, Week 5
February 2012, Week 4
February 2012, Week 3
February 2012, Week 2
February 2012, Week 1
January 2012, Week 5
January 2012, Week 4
January 2012, Week 3
January 2012, Week 2
January 2012, Week 1
December 2011, Week 5
December 2011, Week 4
December 2011, Week 3
December 2011, Week 2
December 2011, Week 1
November 2011, Week 5
November 2011, Week 4
November 2011, Week 3
November 2011, Week 2
November 2011, Week 1
October 2011, Week 5
October 2011, Week 4
October 2011, Week 3
October 2011, Week 2
October 2011, Week 1
September 2011, Week 5
September 2011, Week 4
September 2011, Week 3
September 2011, Week 2
September 2011, Week 1
August 2011, Week 5
August 2011, Week 4
August 2011, Week 3
August 2011, Week 2
August 2011, Week 1
July 2011, Week 5
July 2011, Week 4
July 2011, Week 3
July 2011, Week 2
July 2011, Week 1
June 2011, Week 5
June 2011, Week 4
June 2011, Week 3
June 2011, Week 2
June 2011, Week 1
May 2011, Week 5
May 2011, Week 4
May 2011, Week 3
May 2011, Week 2
May 2011, Week 1
April 2011, Week 5
April 2011, Week 4
April 2011, Week 3
April 2011, Week 2
April 2011, Week 1
March 2011, Week 5
March 2011, Week 4
March 2011, Week 3
March 2011, Week 2
March 2011, Week 1
February 2011, Week 4
February 2011, Week 3
February 2011, Week 2
February 2011, Week 1
January 2011, Week 5
January 2011, Week 4
January 2011, Week 3
January 2011, Week 2
January 2011, Week 1
December 2010, Week 5
December 2010, Week 4
December 2010, Week 3
December 2010, Week 2
December 2010, Week 1
November 2010, Week 5
November 2010, Week 4
November 2010, Week 3
November 2010, Week 2
November 2010, Week 1
October 2010, Week 5
October 2010, Week 4
October 2010, Week 3
October 2010, Week 2
October 2010, Week 1
September 2010, Week 5
September 2010, Week 4
September 2010, Week 3
September 2010, Week 2
September 2010, Week 1
August 2010, Week 5
August 2010, Week 4
August 2010, Week 3
August 2010, Week 2
August 2010, Week 1
July 2010, Week 5
July 2010, Week 4
July 2010, Week 3
July 2010, Week 2
July 2010, Week 1

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